- The Washington Times - Thursday, April 29, 2010

NEW YORK

Laura Bush book suggests poisoning

NEW YORK | Former first lady Laura Bush writes in her forthcoming autobiography that she and her husband, George W. Bush, may have been poisoned when they became ill at a summit in Germany in 2007, the New York Times reported Wednesday.

Writing in her book “Spoken From the Heart,” due to be released next month, Mrs. Bush says the U.S. Secret Service investigated whether the presidential delegation might have been poisoned at the Group of Eight summit.

Mr. Bush spent part of the summit bedridden.

Doctors concluded that they had contracted a virus, Mrs. Bush says, according to the Times report.

However “we never learned if any other delegations became ill or if ours, mysteriously, was the only one,” Mrs. Bush writes.

She also writes about a fatal November 1963 car accident when she was 17 in Texas and at the wheel of a car that hit another, killing the driver, a fellow student.

“I lost my faith that November, lost it for many, many years,” she writes.

WHITE HOUSE

Obama: Immigration may have to wait

ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE | President Obama said Wednesday that there “may not be an appetite” in Congress to deal with immigration immediately after going through a tough legislative year.

With energy legislation on the table and midterm elections approaching, Mr. Obama said he didn’t want to force an immigration bill through Congress “just for the sake of politics.” Still, he said discussions on the issue must move forward in a way that can garner the support of the American people.

“We’ve gone though a very tough year, and I’ve been working Congress very hard, so I know there may not be an appetite immediately to dive into another controversial issue,” the president told reporters aboard Air Force One returning with him to Washington from a Midwest trip.

The issue of immigration bubbled to the surface in recent days after Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed a bill into law requiring local and state law enforcement to question people about their immigration status if there’s reason to suspect they’re in the country illegally and makes it a state crime to be in the United States illegally.

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