India sets deadline for potential BlackBerry stoppage

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It said this solution was “designed to preclude RIM, or any third party, from reading encrypted information under any circumstances since RIM does not store or have access to the encrypted data. RIM cannot accommodate any request for a copy of a customer’s encryption key, since at no time does RIM, or any wireless network operator or any third party, ever possess a copy of the key.”

RIM said this means BlackBerry users “can maintain confidence in the integrity of the security architecture without fear of compromise.”

BlackBerry’s problems are seen by analysts as a sign of things to come for other smartphone firms.

RIM, meanwhile, says it cooperates with all governments with a “consistent standard and the same degree of respect.”

“Any claims that we provide, or have ever provided, something unique to the government of one country that we have not offered to the governments of all countries, are unfounded,” it said.

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About the Author
Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen

Ashish Kumar Sen is a reporter covering foreign policy and international developments for The Washington Times.

Prior to joining The Times, Mr. Sen worked for publications in Asia and the Middle East. His work has appeared in a number of publications and online news sites including the British Broadcasting Corp., Asia Times Online and Outlook magazine.

 

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