- The Washington Times - Thursday, August 19, 2010

The award-winning MyFord Touch driver connect technology is just the start of an entire suite of class-exclusive convenience features and technologies available on the 2011 Ford Edge and not found on crossovers that cost twice the price.

“The 2011 Ford Edge delivers the perfect blend of style, technology and capability our customers demand,” said Jason Mase, crossover marketing manager. “The Edge has been at the forefront of consumer-focused features and conveniences such as SYNC, which allowed customers to connect their devices in a vehicle like never before. Now MyFord Touch builds on that heritage with new driver connect technology that leads the industry.”

MyFord Touch won both Popular Mechanics’ Editor’s Choice Award and CNET’s “Best of CES” in the car and GPS technology category at the 2010 International CES (Consumer Electronics Show).

MyFord Touch, standard on the 2011 Edge Limited, 2011 Edge Sport and available on the 2011 Edge SEL, defines an all-new in-car experience. It takes vehicle interior design into the realm of popular personal electronics devices such as laptop computers, mobile phones and MP3 players, such as:


Five-way buttons mounted on the steering wheel, naturally placed for a driver’s thumbs to control menu commands and select functions

An 8-inch LCD screen in the center stack and two 4.2-inch screens in the instrument cluster provide vehicle and infotainment information

Voice control, including a new “flattened grammar” system that simplifies common commands and introduces voice control for more features, such as audio tuning and climate control

Media hub with tawo USB 2.0 ports, audio and video input jacks and an SD card slot

An upgrade to the MyFord Touch system is the Sony Audio System, which adds a Sony-designed electronic center stack panel with a high-gloss black finish and unique treatment of the touch-sensitive controls. The Sony panel is completely flat (except for the center knob), so the touch cells are executed as circular “landing zones” for the finger.

The heart of the Sony Audio System is its extraordinary sound quality. Comprised of 12 high-quality speakers and a Class D all-digital amplifier, the Sony system has the ability to pump out 390 watts of continuous power (RMS). Further, Dolby Pro Logic II technology creates true virtual 5.1 channel surround sound throughout the car for a unique listening experience.

MyFord Touch is powered by Ford SYNC, the award-winning voice-activated communications and entertainment system developed by Ford and Microsoft that fully integrates Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones and digital media players into the vehicle. Standard with SYNC is the Traffic, Directions and Information application, which provides simple hands-free access to personalized traffic reports, precise turn-by-turn driving directions and up-to-date information including business listings, news, sports and weather.

Google Maps is added to the “Send to SYNC” feature, allowing drivers to send destinations from Google Maps to their vehicle through the cloud-based SYNC Traffic, Directions and Information app. Drivers download destination information into the vehicle via their Bluetooth-enabled mobile phones; the information will be processed into audible turn-by-turn directions, eliminating the need to bring printed maps.

Also available on the 2011 Ford Edge is the world’s first implementation of iTunes Tagging in a factory-installed HD Radio receiver. With a simple push of the “TAG” button on the MyFord touch screen display, the song information will be stored in the radio’s memory.

Once a song is tagged, customers will dock their iPod to the SYNC system and the “tagged” song information will transfer to that iPod. Up to 100 tags on SYNC can be stored until the iPod is connected. When the iPod is then synced to iTunes, a playlist of tagged songs will appear. Customers can preview, and if desired, purchase and download tagged songs from the iTunes Store.

One significant benefit of HD Radio technology, included with the Sony system, is the sound quality of the broadcast. With digital transmission, sound quality is dramatically better - FM sounds like a CD and AM sounds like today’s FM broadcasts. And unlike analog broadcasts, digital broadcasts aren’t susceptible to interference, fadeout and other issues.

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