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“Peter Gunn” marked the beginning of a fruitful collaboration between Mr. Edwards and Mancini, who composed melodic scores and songs for most of Mr. Edwards‘ films. Mancini won Academy Awards for the score of “Breakfast at Tiffany‘s”; the song “Moon River,” from “Breakfast”; the title song of “Days of Wine and Roses”; and the score of “Victor/Victoria.”

The Edwards family history extended virtually the entire length of American motion pictures. J. Gordon Edwards was a pioneering director of silent films, including more than 20 with the exotic vamp Theda Bara. His son, Jack McEdwards (the family name), became a top assistant director and production manager in Hollywood.

William Blake McEdwards was born July 26, 1922, in Tulsa, Okla. The family moved to Hollywood three years later, and the boy grew up on his father’s movie sets.

Mr. Edwards began in films as an actor, playing small roles in such movies as “A Guy Named Joe” and “Ten Gentlemen From West Point.” After 18 months in the Coast Guard in World War II, he returned to acting but soon realized he lacked the talent. With John Champion, he wrote a Western, “Panhandle,” which he produced and acted in for the quickie studio Monogram. He followed with “Stampede.”

In 1947, Mr. Edwards turned to radio and created the hard-boiled “Richard Diamond, Private Detective” for Dick Powell. It was converted to television in 1957, starring David Janssen with Mary Tyler Moore as his secretary, whose face is never seen on-screen.

Tiring of the TV grind, Mr. Edwards returned to films and directed his first feature, “Bring Your Smile Along.” After a few more B movies, which he usually co-wrote, he made the big time in 1958 with “The Perfect Furlough,” starring Tony Curtis and Janet Leigh, and “Operation Petticoat” with Cary Grant and Curtis.

“Breakfast at Tiffany‘s” in 1961 established Mr. Edwards as a stylish director who could combine comedy with bittersweet romance. His next two films proved his versatility: the suspenseful “Experiment in Terror” (1962) and “Days of Wine and Roses” (1963), the story of a couple’s alcoholism, with Lemmon in his first dramatic role.

“The Great Race,” about an auto race in the early 1900s, marked Mr. Edwards‘ first attempt at a big-budget spectacle. He spent Warner Bros.’ money lavishly, raising the ire of studio boss Jack Warner. The 1965 release proved a modest success.

Mr. Edwards‘ disdain for the studios reached a peak in the 1970 “Darling Lili,” a World War I romance starring his new wife, Miss Andrews, and Rock Hudson. The long, expensive shoot on location in Paris location infuriated the Paramount bosses. The movie flopped, continuing Miss Andrews‘ decline from her position as Hollywood’s No. 1 star.

For a decade, Mr. Edwards‘ only hits were “Pink Panther” sequels. Then came “10,” which he also produced and wrote. The sex comedy became a box-office winner, creating a new star in Bo Derek and restoring the director’s reputation. He scored again in 1982 with “Victor/Victoria,” with Miss Andrews playing a woman who poses as a (male) female impersonator. His later films became more personal, particularly the 1986 “That’s Life,” which he wrote with his psychiatrist.

After Sellers‘ death in 1980, Mr. Edwards attempted to keep the “Pink Panther” franchise alive. He wrote and directed “Curse of the Pink Panther” in 1983 and “Son of the Pink Panther” in 1993, but both were failed efforts.

A 2006 remake of the original with Steve Martin as Clouseau was modestly successful; its 2009 follow-up was less so. Both had new directors, with Mr. Edwards credited as a writer.

He continued to supervise Miss Andrews‘ career, which included a short-lived television series and her 1996 return to Broadway in a $8.5 million version of “Victor/Victoria.” Mr. Edwards directed the show, which drew mixed reviews. When Miss Andrews was the only one connected with the musical to be nominated for a Tony, she announced to a matinee audience that she was declining the nomination because her co-workers had been snubbed.

Miss Andrews and Mr. Edwards married in 1968. She had a daughter, Emma, from her marriage to Broadway designer Tony Walton. Mr. Edwards had a daughter, Jennifer, and a son, Geoffrey, from his marriage to Patricia Edwards. He and Miss Andrews adopted two Vietnamese children, Amy and Jo.

A longtime painter, Mr. Edwards began sculpting in midlife, and his bronze works in the style of Henry Moore drew critical praise in shows in Los Angeles and Bucks County, Pa.

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