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The WikiLeaks Task Force will “examine whether the latest release of documents might affect the agency’s foreign relationships or operations,” CIA spokesman George Little said.

Few of the thousands of confidential documents leaked by WikiLeaks were from the CIA, but many were secret communications by high-ranking diplomats discussing sensitive questions of world and U.S. affairs.

The task force, headed by the CIA’s Counterintelligence Center, is to make an inventory of the leaked cables and will report on the impact of the leaks, particularly regarding the ability to recruit informants, said a source who asked not to be named.

WEST BANK

Draft on settlements ready for U.N.

BETHLEHEM | A Palestinian draft resolution condemning Israel’s West Bank settlement activity is ready to be presented to the U.N. Security Council, a senior Palestinian official said Wednesday.

Saeb Erekat, the chief Palestinian negotiator in peace talks with Israel, said he expects the resolution would be put to a Security Council vote in February, after the United States ends its presidency of the council.

He said 15 nations had helped draft the proposal after Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas requested a Security Council meeting to discuss settlement building in November.

BRITAIN

Wintry weather is Heathrow’s latest woe

LONDON | Managers at Heathrow Airport boasted last month that their snow team was working flat out to ensure the facility “will once again be prepared for the onset of winter.”

Then a few inches of snow fell, and Europe’s busiest airport shut down. People slept on floors under foil blankets, or were turned away outside terminals, Christmas travel plans in ruins.

Flights were returning to normal Wednesday, but the fallout continued, with Heathrow boss Colin Matthews renouncing his annual bonus as a gesture of contrition.

With passengers still deeply angry and politicians echoing their complaints, the most enduring damage from the snowstorm may be to the reputation of an airport that was already overcrowded, unloved and in need of an upgrade.

IRAN

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