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“We want the end result of this legal action to be for the people of Alaska to not only have full faith in the outcome of this race but a confidence in the manner in which elections will be conducted in our state in the future,” he said. “Election integrity is vital.”

Mr. Miller contends the state violated the election and equal protection clauses of the U.S. Constitution in its handling of the vote count.

The law calls for write-in ballots to have the ovals filled and the candidate’s last name or name as it appears on the declaration of candidacy written in. Mr. Miller believes the state should be held to a strict reading of that law, and his attorneys argued that spelling mattered.

The state, pointing to case law, used discretion in determining voter intent and allowed for ballots with misspellings to be counted toward Mrs. Murkowski’s tally.

Attorneys for the state argued that Mr. Miller’s interpretation would disenfranchise voters. The state Supreme Court agreed and called voter intent “paramount.”