- Associated Press - Wednesday, December 29, 2010

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - It’s the final week of the regular-season and the Colts have suddenly become a team on the run.

A three-man running attack has finally given Peyton Manning the kind of offensive balance he needs to excel, and the Colts defense has, well, finally figured out how to stop opposing ball carriers.

The combination has put the Colts in position to make the playoffs again and possibly even defend their AFC title.

“I think we’ve developed a sense of attitude,” linebacker Clint Session said Wednesday. “When you’re dealing with a lot of key players going down, it’s hard to get that confidence and attitude and that’s really what we’ve developed over the last few weeks is that attitude. We’ve taken it and run with it.”

Against three of the league’s top 10 runners _ Chris Johnson, Maurice Jones-Drew and Darren McFadden _ Indy (9-6) has yielded 268 yards rushing over the last three weeks, just 89.3 per game. In the first 12 games, the Colts were giving up 142.8 yards on the ground, easily the team’s biggest weakness.

If Indy comes up with one more good performance in Sunday’s rematch with Johnson, the Colts will clinch their seventh AFC South title in eight years, get a first-round home game and earn an NFL record-tying ninth straight playoff appearance. Dallas went every season from 1975-83.

It’s not the first time something like this has happened in Indy.

“It does feel like 2006, just a little bit,” Pro Bowl defensive end Dwight Freeney said, referring to the year everybody discounted Indy as a Super Bowl contender because of a suspect run defense. “But that’s how it’s always been the case. If you’re going to critique a team, you’ve got to find the biggest weakness.”

For the Colts’ undersized defense, that’s usually been holding up against the run. Over the last three weeks, Indy has made giant strides.

“We’re tackling better,” three-time Pro Bowl defensive end Robert Mathis said. “And that helps a whole lot.”

So does continuity after a season spent scrambling to plug holes because of injuries.

Hard-hitting safety Bob Sanders went down with a season-ending torn biceps muscle in the first quarter of the season-opener. His replacement, Melvin Bullitt, was lost for the season three weeks later. Middle linebacker Gary Brackett, the defensive captain, missed four of the next six games with groin and toe injuries. Session hasn’t played since Nov. 1 because of a dislocated right elbow. Three weeks ago, cornerback Jerraud Powers went down with a season-ending broken arm. And last week, Indy’s top run stuffer, defensive tackle Daniel Muir, sat out with a chest injury.

In all, 11 of the 17 Colts’ players on injured reserve are from the defensive side.

Yet somehow, the Colts seem to have found a rotation that works.

“We’ve done a better job of gap control,” coach Jim Caldwell said. “I think we’ve been better tacklers the last couple of weeks, so I think those things help you get into position to make a few more plays and I think we’ve done that.”

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