- The Washington Times - Thursday, February 18, 2010

FEDERAL RESERVE

Jobless numbers expected to stay high

The Federal Reserve expects the unemployment rate to stay high over the next two years because recession-scarred Americans are likely to stay cautious, making for only a moderate-paced economic recovery.

Fed policymakers said in a forecast released Wednesday that it will take “some time” for the economy and the job market to return to normal. They did not spell out how long that would be. They previously suggested that it could take five or six years for economic conditions to return to full health. A “sizable minority,” however, say it could take more than five or six years for the economy and the job market to return to normal.

In updated economic projections, the Fed said the unemployment rate this year could hover between 9.5 percent and 9.7 percent. The jobless rate is projected to drop next year to between 8.2 percent and 8.5 percent and by 2012 to between 6.6 percent and 7.5 percent.

HOUSE

Election date set for Murtha’s seat

HARRISBURG, Pa. | The special election to fill the term of the late U.S. Rep. John P. Murtha will be held on Pennsylvania’s primary election day, May 18.

Gov. Edward G. Rendell made the announcement Wednesday. Mr. Rendell had 10 days after Murtha’s death to make the announcement, and was required to set the date after at least 60 days.

That means two elections on primary day will involve Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District.

One will decide the Republican and Democratic nominees to run in the general election in November. The other will fill the remainder of Murtha’s term, which ends in January.

Murtha died Feb. 8 after complications from gallbladder surgery. He was 77. He was first elected to the seat in 1974.

GITMO

Judge rejects suit on detainee deaths

A judge has dealt a setback to the families of two Guantanamo Bay detainees in a lawsuit that claims former Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, U.S. military officers and medical personnel were responsible for the detainees’ deaths.

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