Continued from page 1

“There is either a refusal or inability by local authorities to take care of them,” she said. “I think it’s a question of leadership. This stuff requires institutional changes that require the political leadership of the community to make it last.”

Eric Hessler, a lawyer for Gisevius, said the indictment wasn’t a surprise.

“We have long anticipated that this day may come,” he said.

Claude Kelly, a lawyer for Dugue, called it “a travesty” and denied his client participated in a cover-up.

“This is just overreaching, Monday morning quarterbacking by the government,” Kelly said.

Faulcon, who resigned from the department shortly after the storm, was arrested at his home in Houston. Gisevius, Bowen and Villavaso surrendered at FBI headquarters in New Orleans.

U.S. Attorney Jim Letten said prosecutors will ask for all four of them to be detained.

Some of the defense attorneys bristled at the arrest of Faulcon.

“They really didn’t have to do that,” said Frank DeSalvo, a lawyer for Bowen. “Nobody is going anywhere. We’ve never thought about doing anything other than face these charges.”

Kaufman and Dugue weren’t arrested. A date for the men’s initial court appearances wasn’t immediately set.

The indictment claims Faulcon shot 40-year-old Ronald Madison, who had severe mental disabilities, in the back as he ran away on the west side of the bridge. Bowen is charged with stomping and kicking Madison while he was lying on the ground, wounded but still alive.

His brother, Lance Madison, was arrested and charged with trying to kill police officers. He was jailed for three weeks and released without being indicted.

Bowen, Gisevius, Faulcon and Villavaso also are accused of shooting at an unarmed family on the east side of the bridge, killing 17-year-old James Brissette and wounding four others.

All six officers are charged with participating in the cover-up.

Dugue retired from the force earlier this year. Kaufman has been on paid sick leave.

Story Continues →