- Associated Press - Friday, July 2, 2010

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — President Obama and thousands of ordinary West Virginians honored the late Robert C. Byrd at a memorial service in the late senator’s home state Friday.

With the president, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and other dignitaries on hand, pallbearers carried the late senator’s casket down the red-carpeted steps of the Capitol to its main courtyard for the service honoring Mr. Byrd, who died Monday at the age of 92.

“I’ll remember him when I came to know him,” Mr. Obama told the gathering, “his white hair flowing like a mane, his gait steady with a cane, determined to make the most of every last breath. The distinguished gentleman from West Virginia could be found at his desk to the very end and doing the people’s business.”

Former President Bill Clinton sought to humanize Mr. Byrd after other speakers from Victoria Kennedy, widow of the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, to Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid canonized him.


Recalling Mr. Byrd’s ability to bring billions of dollars to West Virginia, Mr. Clinton said he told the senator: “If you pave every single inch of West Virginia, it’s going to be much harder to mine coal.” Mr. Byrd responded that “the constitution does not prohibit humble servants from delivering whatever they can to their constituents.”

Mrs. Kennedy called herself “humbled” to speak for her late husband. She recalled Mr. Byrd voting in favor of Mr. Obama’s health care reform law on Christmas Eve. “I was in the gallery and tears flowed down my cheeks when he said, ‘Mr. President, this is for my friend Ted Kennedy. Aye.”

Mr. Biden reminded the crowd how much Mr. Byrd cared about his state and improving conditions. “This is a guy who continued to taste, smell and feel the suffering of the people of his state,” Mr. Biden said. “Because of that service you have gained greatly.”

West Virginians stood atop curbs, craned their necks for a better view and clapped along with Appalachian music — Mr. Byrd was an accomplished fiddler — and the West Virginia National Guard’s 249th Army Band playing John Denver’s “Country Roads.”

Mr. Byrd’s casket was draped with a West Virginia flag and a bouquet of red roses.

Some in the crowd came because they knew Mr. Byrd. Others came because of Mr. Byrd’s place in history as a U.S. senator for 51 years.

Charleston’s Howard Swint, said he brought daughters Maddie and Arianna to the event “to celebrate Senator Byrd’s life and public service to West Virginia.”

Mr. Swint recalled meeting Mr. Byrd. “I found him to be a man of tremendous grace despite his years of powerful positions.”

Graduate student Matt Noerpel came thought he’d never met Mr. Byrd. Mr. Noerpel attended a visitation as the senator lay in repose at the Capitol overnight. “It’s Robert Byrd. He’s as much a political legend as there is.”

The nation’s longest-serving member of Congress began his political career at the state Capitol when he was elected to the West Virginia House of Delegates in 1947. He went on to serve in the West Virginia Senate before being elected to Congress in 1953.

He spent nearly six decades in Congress, first in the House of Representatives and then his final 51 years in the Senate. As a senator, he developed a reputation as a master of the chamber’s rules and an oft-feared advocate for West Virginia.

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