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Revel also chastised Lohan for missing a court hearing in May while at the Cannes Film Festival and repeatedly skipping out on court-mandated, alcohol-education classes. She said Lohan lied about using drugs and tried to blame others for the two driving offenses involved in the original charges.

A tearful Lohan pleaded with the judge before the sentencing, saying she did the best she could to juggle jobs and the court-ordered classes and really tried to comply with the terms of her probation.

“I’m not taking this as a joke,” said Lohan, who had an obscenity printed on her left middle finger. “It’s my life. It’s my career I’ve worked for my entire life.”

Revel said she found the starlet’s apology insincere, comparing it to “somebody who cheats and thinks it isn’t cheating if she doesn’t get caught.”

Lohan burst into tears upon hearing the terms of her punishment.

Lohan spent 84 minutes in jail in 2007 after she pleaded guilty to two misdemeanor counts of being under the influence of cocaine and no contest to two counts of driving with a blood-alcohol level above 0.08 percent and one count of reckless driving.

The plea came after a pair of high-profile arrests earlier that year. Lohan was sentenced to three years of probation but had to ask for a yearlong extension in October after she failed to complete her alcohol-education courses on time.

Prosecutor Danette Meyers argued Tuesday that Lohan wasn’t taking the charges or her punishment seriously and urged jail time for the actress.

“You have not caught her attention,” Meyers told the judge. “I appreciate the tears, but I don’t think you’ve got it.”

Lohan’s attorney, Shawn Chapman Holley, claimed that the actress had adhered to the spirit of the law, if not the letter.

“She has gotten it together,” Holley said. “She changed her conduct and is now in compliance with the court’s overall order.”

Lohan may serve less than her 90-day sentence, thanks to jail overcrowding and a state program that credits inmates for good behavior, said Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department spokesman Steve Whitmore. Nonviolent female misdemeanor offenders typically serve about 25 percent of their sentences, he said.

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AP Entertainment Writer Anthony McCartney and Associated Press Writer Nardine Saad contributed to this report.