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Jane Lynch was a double-barreled threat, with a supporting comedy actress bid for her sadistic cheerleading coach in “Glee” and a nod as guest actress for “Two and a Half Men.” She plays a therapist for Sheen’s character.

“Saturday Night Live” received 12 nominations for a total 126 nominations during its run, surpassing the “ER” all-time record of 124 bids. One of the nominations went to Betty White, who at 88 proved you’re never too old for comedy when she hosted the show to big ratings and applause.

White’s competitors include Tina Fey, the former “Saturday Night Live” writer and star who took a break from her “30 Rock,” the second-most nominated comedy with 15 bids, to return as an “SNL” host.

Fey made light Thursday of her best comedy actress nomination for “30 Rock.”

“This is great and exciting news. Also, this seems like an appropriate time for me to announce to NBC that I will not be renewing my contract _ with my gym,” Fey said in a statement. Of the show’s best comedy series bid, she added, “We’re grateful and excited. Especially since today is the fifth anniversary of the day NBC forgot to cancel us.”

White also contributed to yet another nomination, the Snickers candy bar Super Bowl spot that received a nod for best commercial.

“Mad Men” was the most-nominated drama with 17 bids. The darkly sexy 1960s period show has been honored as best drama two years in a row. Its stars, Jon Hamm and January Jones, received acting bids.

Besides “Glee” and “Modern Family,” other nominees for best comedy series include “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” “Nurse Jackie,” “The Office” and last year’s winner, “30 Rock.” The comedy has won three times in a row. Joining “Mad Men,” “Lost” and “The Good Wife” as best drama series nominees were “Breaking Bad,” “Dexter” and first-timer “True Blood,” which overcame TV academy voter reservations about fantasy genre shows.

Only one other miniseries nominee, “Return to Cranford,” is competing with “The Pacific.”

Big names prevailed in the made-for-TV movie category. Al Pacino’s performance as euthanasia advocate Dr. Jack Kevorkian in “You Don’t Know Jack” and the film itself were nominated, while this year’s Oscar winner Jeff Bridges was nominated for “A Dog Year.”

The most-nominated movie was “Temple Grandin,” based on the life of the animal science expert, with 15 bids, including one for star Claire Danes.

“I hadn’t done anything in television since `My So-Called Life,’” Danes said. “Both projects are so extraordinary and since I was last nominated _ since I was a kid _ television has become incredibly sophisticated and a wonderfully fertile ground for actors because there’s just incredible characters available in television shows now and TV movies.”

Other film actors in the TV movie honors hunt are Dennis Quaid and Hope Davis for their portrayals of Bill and Hillary Clinton in “The Special Relationship,” along with co-star Michael Sheen as British politician Tony Blair.

Bryan Cranston, last year’s best drama actor winner for “Breaking Bad,” was nominated again. He’s joined by Hamm, Fox, Michael C. Hall of “Dexter,” Kyle Chandler of “Friday Night Lights” and Hugh Laurie of “House.”

“It’s a double celebration,” said Cranston. “It’s my 21st anniversary today. However, when I turned to my wife and said, ‘Is being nominated enough of an anniversary present for you?’ And she said, ‘No.’ I went, ‘OK. I’ll be right back.’ We will have a double celebration tonight at dinner, yes we will.”

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