Continued from page 1

“My son was murdered! He was murdered! He was murdered,” she said outside the courthouse.

As Mehserle was placed in handcuffs and taken away, he turned to his family and mouthed, “I love you guys.”

Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger issued a statement urging Californians to remain calm and not resort to violence. Mr. Schwarzenegger said he had informed Oakland Mayor Ron Dellums the state was well prepared to assist in maintaining order.

The jury included eight women and four men. None listed their race as black. Seven said they were white, three were Latino, and one was Asian-Pacific. One declined to state their race. They left the courthouse under tight security.

“As we have come to notice, and we as a family has been slapped in the face by a system that has denied us a right to true justice,” said Cephus Johnson, Mr. Grant’s uncle. “We truly do not blame the jury, but we blame the system.”

At least five bystanders videotaped the incident in what was among the most racially polarizing cases in California since four Los Angeles officers were acquitted in 1992 in the beating of Rodney King, setting off deadly rioting.

The trial was moved from Alameda County to Los Angeles because of racial tension and extensive media coverage.

The case was a rare instance in which a police officer stood trial for an on-duty killing and that was captured on video from so many different angles.

Legal experts said the verdict shows the jury sympathized with Mehserle’s version of events.

“It is legally as low as they could go without acquitting him,” University of California, Berkeley, law school professor Erin Murphy said. Prosecutors had a “huge hurdle” to overcome in convincing a jury that an officer with a spotless record meant to kill, even with video of the killing, she said.

Mehserle testified that he struggled with Mr. Grant and saw him digging in his pocket as officers responded to reports of a fight at a train station. Fearing Grant may have a weapon, Mehserle said he decided to shock Mr. Grant with his Taser but pulled his .40-caliber handgun instead.

Alameda County Deputy District Attorney David Stein said in his closing argument that Mehserle let his emotions get the better of him and intended to shoot Mr. Grant with the handgun without justification.

Defense attorney Michael Rains contended the shooting was a tragic accident. Mehserle had no motive to shoot Mr. Grant, even though he was resisting arrest, the lawyer argued.

Risling reported from Los Angeles. Associated Press writers Trevor Hunnicutt in Oakland and Thomas Watkins in Los Angeles also contributed to this report.