- - Wednesday, June 23, 2010

SWAZILAND

New study shows mounting AIDS toll

MBABANE | Swaziland’s death rate more than doubled in a decade, which is proof of the toll of AIDS, statisticians in this southern African kingdom said Wednesday.

Nombulelo Dlamini of the Central Statistical Office discussed a new study comparing censuses in 1997 and 2007 in an interview. The study shows that in 1997, the death rate was 7.6 people in 1,000. By 2007, it was 18.03 per 1,000 people. Life expectancy over the period decreased from 60 to 43 years.

Infant and under-5 mortality death rates also increased during the 10-year period. About 107 in 1,000 babies die in their first year, according to the 2007 census. In 1997 it was 78. Among children under 5, the death rate was about 167 in 1,000 in 2007, compared with 106 in 1997.

EGYPT

Militant leader gets death sentence

CAIRO | A top Egyptian militant leader was sentenced to death Wednesday for killing two police commanders and organizing bomb attacks against security officials and tourists in the 1990s.

Abdel Hamid Musa Abu Aqrab, who headed the military wing of Al-Gama’a Al-Islamiya group, was charged with the premeditated murder of two police commanders who were shot in 1992 and 1993.

State authorities fought gunbattles to put down an organized Islamist uprising in the 1990s. Al-Gama’a Al-Islamiya, one of the militant groups, targeted ministers, police and tourists.

The group also was blamed for a failed 1995 assassination attempt on President Hosni Mubarak in Addis Ababa.

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO

U.N. chief to attend Congo’s anniversary

KINSHASA | U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is to take part in celebrations at the end of June marking the 50th anniversary of the Democratic Republic of Congo’s independence, his special envoy in Kinshasa said Wednesday.

Mr. Ban is expected to arrive in the country, where 20,000 U.N. peacekeepers are deployed, on the eve of June 30 festivities that President Joseph Kabila and Belgian King Albert II also are to attend.

Story Continues →