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M.D. Shahanawaz, a 23-year-old student, teared up as his hopes for a friend who lived in the building dwindled.

“He’s dead,” he said. “Everybody is coming out critical or dead.”

When workers carried a body away from the site on a stretcher, nearby rescuers stopped what they were doing and clasped their hands together in respect for the dead.

One woman whose granddaughter was killed wailed in grief from a nearby roof.

Dozens of black-and-white photographs of the dead hung on the wall outside a mortuary so relatives and friends could identify the bodies of their loved ones.

One man carried away the body of a small boy wrapped in a white sheet.

From another family, Jamuna Halder sat outside on a curb. “My husband is gone. My children are injured in the hospital,” she said.

She lived with her husband and three children in a room for 2,400 rupees ($54) a month after their nearby slum dwelling was demolished. She had been out cleaning houses when the building collapsed. “When I came back, I saw this tragedy had happened.”

Associated Press writers Nirmala George and Kevin Frayer contributed to this report.