- The Washington Times - Monday, November 22, 2010

Susan Levy said she liked the question shouted from a reporter in the throng gathered in front of her.

The reporter had asked whether she expected to feel a sense of peace now that a man had been convicted by a jury of murdering her daughter, Chandra.

“I don’t know,” she said. “There’s always going to be a sadness.”

But Mrs. Levy said she liked the question because the reporter used the term “sense of peace.”

“I can tell you it ain’t closure,” she said. “There’s only closure for buildings.”

For nearly a decade, Mrs. Levy has been cast as the mother of homicide victim Chandra Levy. She faithfully filled that role, sitting quietly in a Washington courtroom during the trial of 29-year-old Ingmar Guandique.

She stared hard at him when a jury declared him guilty of murdering her daughter. Later, she said she didn’t know what she was thinking at that moment.

In a trial that focused so much on the darkest parts of humanity, Mrs. Levy’s presence lent a quiet dignity.

Superior Court Judge Gerald Fisher gave Mrs. Levy special permission to attend the trial, which was necessary because she was a potential witness. She didn’t testify, though her husband did; it was the only day he entered the courtroom.

Mrs. Levy didn’t speak to reporters until after the verdict. She read from a handwritten statement in which she praised victim assistance groups and thanked those involved with the trial, including the defense attorneys.

She also called for an end to violence.

Mrs. Levy took only a few questions from reporters before she said she had spoken enough. Perhaps, she said, she will speak about the case again at some future time.

“The holidays are coming and I really appreciate it that you’d give my family, the Levy family, some time for being together, give me a little time to find out a new normal,” she said.

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