AP Source: Stoutland will be Miami interim coach

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“I’m not worried about me,” Shannon told The AP earlier in the week when asked about his job security. “If they do it, they do it. I think someone will give me another job.”

Shannon is expected to receive a buyout of around $1.5 million. Miami _ a private school that doesn’t have the deepest of pockets when it comes to paying coaches _ has had a fundraising drive to support athletics for several years and believes it will be able to put together enough money to lure a top-notch staff.

Shannon took over for Larry Coker at the end of the 2006 season and went on a mission to change the culture at the school _ which, in many respects, he did.

Miami has been among the nation’s leaders in academic success by its football program, and the off-the-field reputation has been cleaned up considerably.

But it never translated into wins. More specifically, not enough of them.

Shannon went 5-7 in his first season, then 7-6, then 9-4 last year. He never won a bowl game, and never got the Hurricanes past second place in the Atlantic Coast Conference’s Coastal Division. Miami still has not won an ACC championship since leaving the Big East, and hasn’t been part of the Bowl Championship Series since the 2003 season.

Randy Shannon is Miami,” university president Donna Shalala famously said when he was hired, with good reason. Shannon is a native of Miami, played for the Hurricanes and was a longtime assistant coach there before getting the chance to lead the program.

Even after Miami lost last week to Virginia Tech and was eliminated from the ACC race, Shalala sent Shannon a note of support. But when asked by The AP after Saturday’s loss if he was concerned about his future, Shannon simply shrugged and said it would remain a source of speculation, as it had been for about the past six weeks.

Less than six hours later, he was out of a job.

When Hocutt made the decision to fire Miami women’s soccer coach Tricia Taliaferro earlier this fall, he said the Hurricanes’ teams were being judged on how relevant they were nationally.

And football is not a major player on the national scene _ nor has it been for the past several seasons.

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