- The Washington Times - Tuesday, October 12, 2010

This may — or may not — happen to you, but I bet you can relate: There are files on your computer at work that might be very useful to have at home, or you have portable devices such as an Apple iPhone or iPad or a Google Android-based phone, and while you set these up at home, you would rather synchronize those devices at work, or vice versa.

In short, you want or need to have your two computers’ storehouses of music, photos and other multimedia in harmony. Enter Fairfax, Va.-based Siber Systems, and its Mac product GoodSync for Mac Pro. A mere $29.95 can purchase you a carload of peace of mind.

Here’s why: Computer operating systems and their applications will store files in unique ways. Yes, Apple’s Mac OS X has built-in communications to link two computers and transfer files, but without something such as GoodSync for Mac Pro, it becomes a somewhat tedious process of selecting, dragging and dropping from one device to another.

With GoodSync, you have a computer on the left side of a window and one on the right. Select a file folder to synchronize — Documents or Music or Photos — and then click. The magic takes over, and in a relatively short period of time, you have the same documents, music and photo libraries on both devices.

In turn, this makes for a little trick: Switch your iPhone or iPad from computer A to computer B after syncing these libraries, and iTunes, the Apple application that manages these devices, will happily make the switch without question. No worries about erasing anything on the mobile device. It’s very neat.

You might not need, or think you’ll need, something such as GoodSync for Mac Pro more than once or twice in your computing lifetime. But you’ll find enough uses for it, I predict, to make it a program well worth having. And the price is right at just under $30. (Another hint: You only need one GoodSync software license to connect two machines. If you want to sync two different computers to, say, another server or computer, you’ll need an extra license, on sale for $9.95.)

Yes, I’m sold on GoodSync for Mac. It worked so cleanly, quickly and completely that I frankly couldn’t imagine a better way to handle this kind of housekeeping chore.

Meanwhile, the Good Book finds a Mac home.

Logos 4 Mac, the Macintosh implementation of the justifiably renowned Logos Bible Software, was officially released Oct. 1, and the final product seems well worth the wait.

Bible software is something of intense interest to a niche market, but it also is a harbinger of how computer systems can make a vast array of references accessible to a student or researcher. Click on a Bible verse displayed in Logos 4 Mac, and you can find a plethora of commentary, dictionary, linguistic and other references from which to choose, depending, of course, on how much is in your digital library. Then again, the options are almost limitless, with thousands and thousands of titles available and more on the way almost daily.

What sells me on Logos 4 Mac is not only the content, some of which I just cannot find elsewhere, but the ease of use, the faithfulness to the Mac format and some neat features, such as synchronizing data “to the cloud” for backup and keeping user preferences, notes, reading plans and libraries in sync across a variety of devices, including PCs, Macs, iPhones and iPads.

Retail pricing for the Logos products range from $264.95 to $4,290, depending on the amount of content you want. (That high-end product is said to contain approximately $31,250 worth of reference materials, making the non-print discount rather nice.)

So here you have two pieces of good Mac software, with two distinct purposes, at good price points. What’s not to like?

E-mail mkellner@washingtontimes.com.

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