Inside the Ring

continued from page 1

Question of the Day

What has been the biggest debacle on Obama's watch?

View results

Two service members who attended separate sessions that day both told The Washington Times that Gen. Bostick likened opponents of openly gay personnel with those who opposed integration after World War II. A third attendee, a civilian employee, went on the record to make the same charge in a letter to The Times.

Said Army spokesman Lt. Col. Christopher Garver: “We have found no evidence that Lt. Gen. Bostick even remotely made a reference like that.”

Whether IG investigators can settle the issue is unclear. There are no known recordings of his remarks as part of a Pentagon team assessing how to lift the ban on open gays, a priority of President Obama.

One of the two unnamed sources told The Times he took mental notes of Gen. Bostick’s remarks and wrote them down 10 minutes later. This source said Gen. Bostick used the word “racist” in making a comparison between the 1940s and the gay debate of today.

North Korean missiles

North Korea’s military displayed new missiles during the major parade Sunday marking the promotion of Kim Jong-il’s son, Kim Jong-un, as the next “Dear Leader.”

According to U.S. officials and private military analysts, the parade provided the first photos of two new systems: a medium-range missile called the Musudan and an advanced surface-to-air missile (SAM) that appears based on Russian and Chinese anti-aircraft missiles.

Richard Fisher, a military analyst with the International Assessment and Strategy Center, said the parade was the first time the North Koreans showed off the Musudan, which has an estimated range of up to 2,500 miles.

Mr. Fisher said the missile was developed with technology obtained from a Russian submarine-launched missile (SLBM) and uses special tubes to store its liquid fuel, increasing the missile’s survivability from attack in the hours before it is set up for firing.

“It appears to have a single warhead,” Mr. Fisher said, noting that the systems on display in Pyongyang may have been mockups, rather than actual missiles.

Mr. Fisher said the Musudan “is larger than the Russian Makayev R-27 SLBM on which it is based.”

The second system is a surface-to-air missile so new there does not appear to be a name for it outside North Korea. The mobile missile was shown with what appears to be two long containers on a Russian-design Kamaz launcher-chasis, along with a separate mobile radar.

The new SAM uses advanced “cold-launch” technology that allows the missile to be popped out its launch tube using air pressure, then fire its engine. The technique permits using lighter metals than those required for missiles that ignite in their tubes.

Politically, Mr. Fisher said the military parade was significant for the high profile role of Zhou Yongkang, a senior Chinese leader who sits on the nine-member Standing Committee of the Communist Party Politburo, headed by President Hu Jintao, that ultimately rules China.

“By sending a member of the standing committee of Politburo, it is the communist equivalent of being blessed by the pope,” Mr. Fisher said. “This signals communist China’s blessing for the continuation of the Kim regime dictatorship.”

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

About the Author
Bill Gertz

Bill Gertz

Bill Gertz is a national security columnist for The Washington Times and senior editor at The Washington Free Beacon (www.freebeacon.com). He has been with The Times since 1985.

He is the author of six books, four of them national best-sellers. His latest book, “The Failure Factory,” on government bureaucracy and national security, was published in September 2008.

Mr. ...

Latest Stories

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks