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Too much sympathy for a treacherous spy

- The Washington Times - Wednesday, October 20, 2010

A review by Joseph C. Goulden that appeared in The Washington Times (Commentary, Oct. 5) of the book "The Invisible Harry Gold: The Man Who Gave the Soviets the Atom Bomb," by Allen M. Hornblum, is either a cream-puff review or the book itself is a cream puff about Harry Gold.

The review paints Gold as a sympathetic figure and says the only reason this American citizen became a spy for the Soviets was he "worked for the Soviets because they opposed anti-Semitism (or so he thought)." It said Gold suffered so much anti-Semitism that he got a job as a chemist - a profession I share - apparently before America's entry into World War II. He then stole commercial trade secrets from his employer. In truth, Harry Gold was a monster, and by bringing the Soviet Union up to speed on atomic weapons, he was one of the chief causes of the Cold War.

ROBERT A. JERUSSI

Fairfax, Va.

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