- The Washington Times - Wednesday, October 27, 2010

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Among the heroes of the world, police officers, too, become victims of crime. Sadly, Baltimore Police Detective Brian Stevenson was an added statistic to this category when he was hit in the head with a large chunk of concrete that caused head trauma so severe that he died as a result of his injuries (“Suspect arrested in police death,” Web, Oct. 17).

Detective Stevenson, who was off duty and celebrating his birthday with a friend, became a crime victim over something as absurd as a parking-space dispute. He was allegedly attacked by a man who has been charged in the crime, Sian James, known to have a history of domestic violence.

Detective Stevenson, a husband and a father just short of 38 years old, had his life ended too soon for the wrong reasons. The loss is deep, the significance of the crime is profound and the impact is far-reaching. Detective Stevenson’s own family, his police family and all colleagues in the criminal justice system are devastated by this news as well as the communities that he served. One didn’t have to know him personally to feel the pain.

Violence has become all too common as a pathetic solution to dissatisfaction and disagreement that is encompassed with anger and rage. The lack of regard for human life is disconcerting, and the proclivity toward violence against anyone - much less a police officer - is abhorrent.

Professionally, Detective Stevenson touched many lives in his work and impacted others greatly on a personal level. He leaves behind indelible memories, unforgettable stories and resulting heartbreak. Rest in peace, Detective Stevenson.

KAREN L. BUNE

Victim Specialist

Prince George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office

Upper Marlboro, Md.

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