You are currently viewing the printable version of this article, to return to the normal page, please click here.

Clinton vows to fight sex slavery

Asia-Pacific trip includes visit to Cambodia

- Associated Press - Sunday, October 31, 2010

SIEM REAP, Cambodia | Sitting out the intense political battle back home, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton toured Cambodia's famed 12th-century Angkor Wat temple complex on Sunday and pledged to do more to help end the scourge of sexual slavery on a visit to a rehabilitation center for child prostitutes.

While her husband and fellow Democrats campaigned frantically ahead of Tuesday's midterm congressional elections, the former first lady and New York senator stayed above the domestic fray, visiting the northern Cambodian city of Siem Reap while in the midst of a two-week, seven-nation trip to the Asia-Pacific.

The self-proclaimed ex-politician is barred from partisan political activity while serving as America's top diplomat. She made no mention of the fierce fight for control of Congress, even as American tourists who supported her 2008 presidential bid shouted "California loves you, Hillary" as she strolled through Angkor Wat.

Mrs. Clinton, the first secretary of state to visit Angkor Wat, made her way around the massive site, admiring bas-relief wall sculpture and the sheer size of the temples. A bevy of security agents and photographers accompanied her.

Earlier Sunday, she met about 50 victims of human trafficking at the U.S.-funded Siem Reap Center, where they receive education and vocational training that includes weaving and sewing lessons and, for some, English-language lessons in Colorado.

"I am so proud of you," Mrs. Clinton told the girls and young women, most of whom were between 17 and 23.

"You motivate me," she said, promising them continued American support to improve their lives.

The Siem Reap Center received a $336,000 grant from the State Department last year to fund its operating costs, and Mrs. Clinton said she would make sure money continued to flow.

Combating human trafficking is a pet issue for Mrs. Clinton and one she will raise with Cambodian officials when she stops in the capital of Phnom Penh on Monday. After leaving Cambodia, Mrs. Clinton will visit Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, New Zealand and Australia.

She won't be back at work in Washington until a week after Election Day.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.