Political Scene

continued from page 1

Question of the Day

Is it still considered bad form to talk politics during a social gathering?

View results

Under current requirements, financial institutions each year file about 14 million reports on transactions in excess of $10,000.

JUSTICE

Stevens prosecutor commits suicide

A Justice Department prosecutor killed himself while under investigation over whether he and other attorneys in the prosecution of Sen. Ted Stevens acted improperly in the case, officials said.

Nicholas A. Marsh, 37, committed suicide on Sunday, two years after being part of the Justice Department team that convicted Mr. Stevens on corruption charges that were eventually thrown out. Mr. Marsh’s suicide was confirmed by his attorney, Robert Luskin.

“I think Nick loved being a prosecutor and I think he was incredibly fearful that this would prevent him from continuing to work for the Justice Department,” Mr. Luskin said Monday. “It’s incredibly tragic after all this time when we were on the verge of a successful resolution.”

The prosecutors in the Stevens case failed to disclose evidence favorable to the defendant as Supreme Court precedent requires. The omission was so serious that Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. stepped in and asked a federal judge to throw out Stevens’ convictions, which the judge did.

Stevens, a longtime Republican senator from Alaska, lost his Senate seat in an election shortly after his October 2008 conviction. He died in a plane crash in August.

DONATIONS

GOP donors appeal ruling on Crist refunds

Republicans aren’t giving up their quest for refunds of donations they gave Gov. Charlie Crist’s U.S. Senate campaign before he abandoned the GOP to run as an independent.

The attorney for two GOP donors said Monday he will appeal a Naples judge’s denial last week of class-action status in the case. The ruling means each contributor to the Mr. Crist campaign would have to seek a refund through individual court action.

Some Republicans contend Mr. Crist should return at least $7.5 million given to his Senate bid before he left the GOP and became an independent last spring. Mr. Crist’s attorneys say donors have many reasons besides party affiliation to contribute money.

An appeals court in Tallahassee is being asked to prevent the Mr. Crist campaign from spending the money in question.

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks