Beijing police halt unapproved church service

Question of the Day

Should Congress make English the official language of the U.S.?

View results

BEIJING (AP) — Beijing police on Sunday detained dozens of worshippers from an unapproved Christian church who were trying to hold services in a public space after they were evicted from their usual place of worship, a parishioner said.

Leaders of the unregistered Shouwang Church told members to gather at an open-air venue in Beijing for Sunday-morning services, but police, apparently alerted to their plans, taped off the area and took away people who showed up to take part.

China‘s Communist government allows worship only in state-approved churches, but many Christians belong to unregistered congregations. Such “house churches” are subjected to varying degrees of harassment by authorities.

More than 60 million Christians are believed to worship in China‘s independent churches, compared with about 20 million who worship in the state church, according to scholars and church activists.

A church member who went to the gathering spot for services and managed to evade police told the Associated Press that about 200 people were taken away and were being held at a local school. Their cellphones were confiscated, said the man, who would give only his English name, Kane, for fear of police reprisals.

An AP videographer saw about a dozen people escorted by police onto an empty city bus and driven away.

Shouwang Pastor Yuan Ling said by telephone that he was unable to go to the venue because police had put him under house arrest Saturday night. Mr. Yuan said he knew of at least six other church members who were also under house arrest.

Mr. Yuan said fellow parishioners also told him that many worshippers were being held at a school in Beijing’s Haidian district, though he wasn’t sure of the exact number.

Shouwang held services at a Beijing restaurant until last week, when they were evicted.

Chinese authorities have been on high alert for large public gatherings in the wake of anonymous online calls for anti-government protests modeled on demonstrations in the Middle East and North Africa.

No major protests have occurred in China following the calls, but the security crackdown they sparked has resulted in the arrest or detention of dozens of public interest lawyers, writers, intellectuals and activists.

Ai Weiwei, an internationally known avant-garde artist who is also an outspoken government critic, became the highest-profile person targeted in the sweep when he apparently was detained at a Beijing airport a week ago. The Foreign Ministry said he is being investigated for alleged economic crimes, though Beijing police have yet to confirm he is in custody.

Mr. Ai was last seen being led away by police at the airport after being barred from boarding a flight to Hong Kong.

About 50 pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong on Sunday demanded Mr. Ai’s release, peacefully chanting, “No to political persecution,” outside the central Chinese government’s liaison office. Opposition legislator Lee Cheuk-yan tossed a picture of Mr. Ai into the grounds of the compound.

Former British colony Hong Kong enjoys Western-style civil liberties as part of its special semiautonomous status under Chinese rule.

Story Continues →

View Entire Story

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks