Bonds has momentum headed into critical trial week

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The hitter’s former mistress, Kimberly Bell, told the eight-woman, four-man jury that Bonds once told her he used steroids. She also discussed in great detail the physical and behavioral changes she saw the slugger go through that prosecutors attribute to steroid use _ including outbursts and threats against her.

Colorado Rockies first baseman Jason Giambi and three former players testified that Bonds‘ personal trainer, Greg Anderson, had supplied them with steroids and detailed instruction on how to use them.

However, none of the players testified directly about the relationship between Bonds and Anderson, who is in jail for refusing to testify at the trial. Illston admonished the jury not use the players’ testimony as evidence that Anderson supplied Bonds with steroids.

Meanwhile, Bonds‘ attorneys portrayed the ex-mistress as a scorned lover seeking revenge and they caught her in a few inconsistencies. In particular, Bell admitted that she was exaggerating when she told the grand jury that Bonds‘ testicles had shrunk by half late in their relationship.

Many legal observers expect Bonds‘ legal team to call just a few witnesses because they say the case is breaking Bonds‘ way_ with one notable exception: count two of five in his indictment.

Bonds is charged with lying to the grand jury during his appearance in December 2003. He was called to testify what he knew about the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative. That grand jury ultimately indicted five men with connections to BALCO, including Anderson, on steroids distribution charges and related counts. All five pleaded guilty.

Three of Bonds‘ charges accuse of him of lying when he denied knowingly taking steroids and human growth hormone. Another count charges him with obstruction of justice.

Count two is the “needle charge” and legal observers say it’s the government’s best chance for a conviction. Bonds is accused of lying during this exchange before the grand jury:

Prosecutor: “Did Greg ever give you anything that required a syringe to inject yourself with?”

Bonds: “I only had one doctor touch me. And that’s my only personal doctor.”

Bonds goes on to deny that Anderson _ or anyone other than Ting _ ever injected him with anything.

After Ting’s testimony Thursday, prosecutors called Kathy Hoskins to the stand. She is the sister of Steve Hoskins, and worked as Bonds‘ personal shopper for two years ending in 2003.

Hoskins testified that before a road trip in 2002, she saw Anderson inject Bonds in the belly button.

Hoskins came across as likable, down-to-earth and _ most important _ credible. She said Bonds told her the injection was “a little something, something for when I go on the road. You can’t detect it. You can’t catch it.”

On cross examination, Hoskins tearfully denied she was trying to cover up for her brother, who she claimed unfairly entangled her in the case by falsely telling investigators she saw Anderson inject Bonds numerous times.

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