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The general said an investigation will begin shortly to determine exactly how the CH-47 crashed and how the mission was planned.

Also Wednesday, the Pentagon announced that it would formally release the names of the men killed Saturday in the crash, which was the worst loss of Navy SEALs in a single operation. Also killed were the chopper’s five-man Army crew, three other Americans in special operations, and eight Afghans, including an interpreter.

While some of the dead SEALs have been publicly identified by their families, it is not customary for the U.S. military to provide the names of people in covert units.

Pentagon spokesman Col. Dave Lapan said Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta decided to release the names in this case and is expected to do so soon.

The tragedy happened three months after elements of SEAL Team 6, the specialized counterterrorism squad, secretly penetrated Pakistani airspace in special twin-engine Black Hawk helicopters and killed Osama bin Laden.

Most of the SEALs killed Saturday belonged to that unit but were not part of the bin Laden raid.