- Associated Press - Saturday, August 6, 2011

CANTON, OHIO (AP) - That kid who went to college with two brown grocery bags filled with his belongings strutted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night.

Shannon Sharpe joined Chicago Bears sackmaster Richard Dent, Washington Redskins linebacker Chris Hanburger and NFL Films founder Ed Sabol in being inducted into the hall. They were to be followed by Marshall Faulk, the late Les Richter, and Deion Sanders.

When Sharpe headed to Savannah State, all he heard was how he was destined to fail.

“When people told me I’d never make it, I listened to the one person who said I could: me,” Sharpe said.

Failure? Sharpe went from a seventh-round draft pick to the most prolific tight end of his time. He won two Super Bowls with Denver and one with Baltimore, and at the time of his retirement in 2003, his 815 career receptions, 10,060 yards and 62 TDs were all NFL records for a tight end. Three times he went over 1,000 yards receiving in a season _ almost unheard of for that position. In a 1993 playoff game, Sharpe had 13 catches against Oakland, tying a record.

Sharpe patted his bust on the head Saturday before saying, “All these years later, it makes me proud when people call me a self-made man.”

In a mesmerizing acceptance speech, Sharpe passionately made a pitch to get his brother, Sterling, who played seven years with the Packers, considered for election to the shrine. Sterling, who introduced his younger brother for induction, wept as Shannon praised him.

“I am the only player who has been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame and am the second-best player in my family,” Sharpe said.

“I am so honored. You don’t know what this means for me. This is the fraternity of all fraternities.”

Dent was a dynamic pass rusher on one of the NFL’s greatest defenses, the 1985 NFL champions. He was the MVP of that Super Bowl and finished with 137 1/2 career sacks, third all-time when he left the sport.

He epitomized the Monsters of the Midway: fast, fierce and intimidating.

Richard was like a guided missile,” Joe Gilliam, Dent’s college coach, said during his introduction.

“You must dream and you must be dedicated to something in your life,” added Dent, who asked everyone in the audience to rise in applause for Gilliam, then thanked dozens of people, including many from the ‘85 Bears who also were in the stadium. He saved his highest praise for the late Walter Payton.

“When you have dreams, it is very tough to say you can do everything by yourself,” Dent said. “It’s all about other people.”

Sabol made a life out of telling other people’s stories.

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