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Smith said there was no reason to believe Hurd had problems when the Bears signed him before the season.

“No issues, no reason. I’m in shock over it. I never saw it coming,” Smith said. “But just like I think I know most of you, you don’t really know what people do once you’re not with them. But I know that anyone we bring through here, we’ve had an extensive search to find out everything, if there is something out there, and that wasn’t the case. There was nothing we knew about Sam.”

Hurd, a San Antonio native who played college ball at Northern Illinois, spent five seasons with the Dallas Cowboys and is in his first stint with the Bears. He has contributed mostly on special teams, playing in 77 games overall with six starts and two career touchdowns. He has played in 12 games this year, catching eight passes for 109 yards.

The complaint says an informant tipped off authorities in Texas in July, leading to an investigation in which an unidentified acquaintance of Hurd’s “negotiated” for approximately five kilograms of cocaine on the player’s behalf. The acquaintance wanted to buy the drugs quickly to take it to a “northern destination that same day,” the complaint said.

The Bears reached a three-year deal with Hurd this summer that was reportedly worth up to $5.15 million, including a $1.35 million signing bonus and base pay this season of $685,000.

The deal was announced on July 29 _ the day after federal authorities say he had agreed to a “consensual interview” with Homeland Security investigators over $88,000 in cash that had been seized in a car he owned in the Dallas area. The money was inside a canvas bag that authorities said was covered in a plant-like material that tested positive for “properties of marijuana.”

The acquaintance told authorities that Hurd “routinely leaves large amounts” of money in his vehicles, while Hurd said the money was indeed his and that he had given the car to his acquaintance, a car shop employee, for maintenance and detail work.

Hurd showed authorities a bank statement he said showed he had withdrawn $88,000 from his account, but authorities said it did “not reflect the transactions and amounts” he claimed.

Teammates said they couldn’t believe what they were hearing.

“It’s a situation that you don’t, I don’t, want anybody to be in, especially a close friend, a teammate that I’ve been playing with now for four or five years,” said wide receiver Roy Williams, who played with Hurd in Dallas before being reunited on the Bears this year. “Especially a guy from Texas with a wife and a daughter. … I know it has to be tough for him because he has his family.”

Linebacker Brian Urlacher said it’s sad for Hurd, who he called a good teammate and good guy. But he said it won’t affect the team’s play.

“Football-wise it’s not going to be an issue,” Urlacher said. “We’ll go out there and practice like we do every day and hopefully put it behind us when Sunday gets here.”

In 2009, four years into his NFL career, Hurd established a charitable organization, Running with the Hurd, aimed at mentoring kids. The organization sponsored a football camp in the South Texas city of Harlingen last year.

Hurd’s sister, Jawanda Newsome, told the San Antonio Express-News in 2008 that her brother was paying to fix up their parents’ home as well as covering his younger brother’s junior college tuition. She said she worried about her brother because he was so prone to give his money away.

Newsome told the newspaper Thursday she is hoping people will refrain from speculating about her brother’s case.

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