- Associated Press - Wednesday, February 16, 2011

SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Authorities flooded the streets of Yemen’s capital with 2,000 police Wednesday to try to put down days of Egypt-style demonstrations against the president of 32 years, a key U.S. ally in battling al Qaeda.

The policemen, including plainclothes officers, fired in the air and blocked thousands of students at Sanaa University from joining thousands of other protesters who were holding a sixth straight day of demonstrations in the capital of the Arab world’s most impoverished nation.

A call spread via Facebook and Twitter urging Yemenis to join a series of “One Million People” rallies on a so-called “Friday of Rage” in all Yemeni cities, seeking the ouster of President Ali Abdullah Saleh.

“We will remain in the streets until the regime departure,” according to a statement posted on Facebook. Copies signed by a group named the Feb. 24 Movement were distributed among youth via e-mail. The group is taking that name because organizers hope to have their biggest protest on that day next week.

Taking inspiration from the toppling of autocratic leaders in Egypt and Tunisia, the protesters are demanding political reforms and Mr. Saleh’s resignation, complaining of poverty, unemployment and corruption.

Mr. Saleh has tried to defuse protesters’ anger amid the unprecedented street demonstrations by saying he will not run for another term in 2013 and that he will not seek to set up his son, Ahmed, to succeed him in the conflict-ridden nation.

Protesters still chanted slogans against the president’s son Wednesday.

Mr. Saleh has become a key U.S. partner in battling al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the terrorist network’s offshoot in Yemen. The group’s several hundred fighters have battled Mr. Saleh’s U.S.-backed forces and have been linked to attacks beyond Yemen’s borders, including the failed attempt to blow up a Detroit-bound airliner in December 2009. The U.S. military plans a $75 million training program with Yemen’s counterterrorism unit to expand its size and capabilities in the nation’s mountainous terrain.

It’s a difficult balancing act for Mr. Saleh, who has been criticized as being too close to the United States.

Yemeni state TV reported that Mr. Saleh has been holding meetings since Sunday with heads of tribes to prevent them from joining the anti-government protests.

Witnesses said police chained Saana University’s iron gates in order to prevent students from streaming into adjacent streets. They said at least four protesters were wounded in scuffles with police.

Demonstrations also took in Yemen’s port city of Aden and in Taiz, where thousands shouted, “Down … down with Ali Abdullah Saleh.”

Protesters have been camping in Safir Square in central Taiz, about 270 miles south of Sanaa, saying they will not leave until Mr. Saleh steps down. Just like in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, protesters have organized a makeshift camp in the city center, with medical teams, cleaning crews and security to protect them from outside attacks, said Ghazi al-Samie, a lawyer and activist.

Mr. al-Samie said thousands have joined the protests in the past few days in Yemen’s second-biggest city.

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