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For a team that kept preaching “Wait till next year” after World Series losses to the Yankees in 1953, ‘52, ‘49, ‘47 and ‘41, it was indeed next year. A generation later, long after they’d all grown old, those Dodgers were lauded as the “Boys of Summer” in Roger Kahn’s book.

Born Edwin Donald Snider, he got his nickname at an early age. Noticing his son return home from a game with somewhat of a strut, Snider’s dad said, “Here comes the Duke.”

The name stuck. So did Snider, once he played his first game in the majors in 1947, two days after Jackie Robinson’s historic debut.

A durable slugger with a strong arm, good instincts on the bases and a regal style, Snider hit the last home run at Ebbets Field in 1957.

Snider’s swing gave the Dodgers a lefty presence on a team of mostly righties. He often launched shots over the short right-field wall at the Brooklyn bandbox, rewarding a waiting throng that gathered on Bedford Avenue.

“The Duke’s up,” fans in the upper deck would shout to those on the street.

A wild swinger, Snider was harnessed by Branch Rickey, who made him practice standing at home plate with a bat on his shoulder calling balls and strikes but forbidden to swing.

Snider stayed with the Dodgers when they moved to Los Angeles in 1958 and won another World Series ring the next year. Prematurely gray, “The Silver Fox” returned to New York with the bumbling Mets in 1963 and finished his career in 1964 with the Giants.

“There was no one classier or more easy going than Duke Snider,” Hall of Fame President Jeff Idelson said Sunday. “Above it all, he was a fan favorite for his style of play, personality, accessibility, and fondness for playing stickball with kids in the street of Brooklyn.”

Snider was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1980 on his 11th try. He was a broadcaster for the Montreal Expos for several seasons — he played in the city as a minor leaguer in the Brooklyn farm system — and later was an announcer with the Dodgers.

“One of baseball’s iconic figures — a Hall of Fame player, a Hall of Fame person and a wonderful broadcaster with great recall abilities, and one of the best storytellers I ever worked with,” said Dave Van Horne, the Marlins’ play-by-play man and Snider’s broadcast partner for 15 years with the Expos. “He was a wonderful partner and taught me a lot about the game.”

Hall of Fame broadcaster Marty Brennaman was saddened to hear of Snider’s passing.

“Just a sensational guy. He was the epitome of class and I knew all about his career, the competition in New York between he and Mantle and Mays,” Brennaman said. “He was just a guy who carried himself extremely well, was almost completely devoid of ego. If you met him, you would never had any idea that he carved out the kind of career for himself that he did.”

In 1995, Snider pleaded guilty to federal tax charges and was sentenced to two years’ probation and fined $5,000. He admitted not reporting more than $97,000 in cash from autograph signings, card shows and memorabilia sales.

Snider was sentenced at the Brooklyn federal courthouse, a few miles from where he had starred. The judge said Snider had been “publicly disgraced and humiliated … here in Brooklyn, where you were idolized by a generation … of which I was one.”

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