- Associated Press - Sunday, February 27, 2011

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Natalie Portman has won the best-actress Academy Award for her role as a delusional ballerina in “Black Swan,” while Tom Hooper has claimed the best-director Oscar for his British monarchy saga “The King’s Speech.”

Christian Bale and Melissa Leo earned supporting-acting honors Sunday for the boxing tale “The Fighter.”

Portman won over a field that included Annette Bening, who has lost on all four of her Oscar nominations.

The King’s Speech” was expected to claim the last two awards, best actor for Colin Firth and best picture. It also won original screenplay for David Seidler, a boyhood stutterer who was inspired by his story’s subject, stammering King George VI as he struggles to vanquish his crippling speech problem.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

LOS ANGELES (AP) _ Tom Hooper won the best-director Academy Award on Sunday for his British monarchy saga “The King’s Speech,” while Christian Bale and Melissa Leo earned supporting-acting honors for the boxing tale “The Fighter.”

Network censors bleeped Leo for dropping the F-word during her speech. Backstage, she jokingly conceded it was “probably a very inappropriate place to use that particular word.”

“Those words, I apologize to anyone that they offend. There is a great deal of the English language that is in my vernacular,” Leo said.

Bale joked that he was keeping his language clean.

Melissa, I’m not going to drop the F-bomb like she did,” Bale said. “I’ve done that plenty of times before.”

But the Oscars, being a global affair, were telecast elsewhere in the world with Leo’s words uncensored. Viewers who watched the show on Star Movies, a major channel available throughout Asia, heard the F-word loud and clear.

Hooper, a relative big-screen newcomer best known for classy TV drama, took the industry’s top filmmaking prize Sunday over Hollywood veteran David Fincher, who had been a strong prospect for his Facebook drama “The Social Network.”

“The King’s Speech,” which led with 12 nominations, won only one other, for original screenplay, but was expected to claim the last two prizes, best actor and picture.

The prize was presented by last year’s winner, Kathryn Bigelow, the first woman to earn a directing Oscar.

“Thank you to my wonderful actors, the triangle of man love which is Colin Firth, Geoffrey Rush and me. I’m only here because of you guys,” Hooper said, referring to his film’s male stars.

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