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Egyptian Vice President Omar Suleiman met several major opposition groups, including the outlawed Muslim Brotherhood, for the first time Sunday and offered new concessions, including freedom of the press, release of those detained during the protests and the eventual lifting of the country’s hated emergency laws.

Egypt’s state-run news agency reported Monday that Mr. Mubarak had ordered the country’s parliament and its highest appellate court to re-examine lower-court rulings disqualifying hundreds of ruling-party lawmakers for campaign and ballot irregularities, that were ignored by electoral officials — possibly paving the way for new elections.

The ruling National Democratic Party won more than 83 percent of the 518 seats in the 2010 parliamentary elections, which were widely condemned as being rigged.

Judicial officials also promised to start the questioning on Tuesday of three former ministers and a senior ruling party official accused of corruption charges after they were dismissed by Mr. Mubarak last week. The Cabinet reshuffle was intended to placate protesters by removing some of the most hated officials in the government.

The official Middle East News Agency said former Tourism Minister Zohair Garanah would be questioned Tuesday along with the former ministers of housing and trade.

MENA also reported that the country’s top prosecutor had imposed a travel ban on former Interior Minister Habib al-Adli and froze his bank account.

Life in Cairo was returning to a more normal routine after the weeks of upheaval. Banks were open for limited hours along with many shops. The stock market announced it would reopen Sunday, though schools still were shut for the midyear holiday. Traffic was returning to ordinary levels in many places, and the start of the nighttime curfew was relaxed to 8 p.m.

Associated Press writer Karin Laub contributed to this article.