- Associated Press - Tuesday, January 11, 2011

LOS ANGELES (AP) - Ted Williams, the Ohio homeless man whose smooth radio voice made him an Internet sensation, had to do some quick talking to Los Angeles police.

Officers were called when Williams and his daughter got into a heated argument Monday night at the Renaissance Hollywood Hotel & Spa, Officer Catherine Massey said.

“I don’t know how loud they were” but the argument at about 9 p.m. led to a disturbance report, Massey said Tuesday.

“It was minor. Both parties were angry but there were no signs of visible abuse,” Massey said. “They were brought in, calmed down, talked to and released.”


She said she did not know the nature of the argument.

Williams and his daughter, whom Massey declined to name, were held at the Hollywood police station for less than an hour and they were not arrested, she said.

It was not immediately clear whether the two returned to the hotel. Calls to a hotel marketing representative seeking comment were not immediately returned.

Williams‘ manager, Al Battle, declined to comment about or provide details of the incident but said a statement would be issued soon.

“Once we get all the facts, it’ll be out there for everybody to have,” he said in a brief phone interview with The Associated Press.

Williams was in town to tape an appearance on TV’s “Dr. Phil” show.

The two-part episode was taped over the weekend to air Tuesday and Wednesday. On the Wednesday segment, Williams meets with his ex-wife, Patricia, and five of his nine children, according to a statement from the show.

“In this emotional reunion, Williams talks openly with his family about the man he is today, the influences that threaten his sobriety and what his children can expect from him in the future. His children respond in a very raw and candid manner,” the statement said.

“Everyone is pulling for Ted, but his 15 minutes are going to be over and then he’ll be left to manage a life filled with temptation,” host Phil McGraw said. “We’re going to try and help him prepare for that because it would be a real tragedy if he did not make the most of this extraordinary second chance.”

Williams, 53, trained to be a radio announcer but found his life derailed by drugs and alcohol in the 1990s. He has served time in prison for theft and forgery and has been cited with numerous misdemeanors, including drug abuse.

Williams became famous almost overnight after The Columbus Dispatch newspaper posted a web video of him last week. Viewers were enthralled to hear a deep, honeyed professional voice coming from the shabbily dressed man.

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