Continued from page 2

Deruyter said Fuller has no family or children, and was coping with the shooting almost entirely on his own and lost his temper at the town hall.

In media interviews and on the Internet, Fuller, a former limousine driver and Census worker, has said he worked hard to get Giffords re-elected in her conservative-leaning district.

He was shot in the knee and back and drove himself to the hospital, where he spent two days.

On Friday, he showed up at the home of Loughner, who lived within a half-mile of Fuller.

“He said he was going to forgive him for shooting him,” Richard Elder, 86, a retired medical mechanic who lives next door to Fuller, told The Associated Press Sunday. “If anyone shot me, I don’t think I’d say, ‘Hey feller, that’s all right.’”

Humphries, the man Fuller is accused of threatening, said he was worried about the threat, and the dozens of other angry e-mails he has received.

“I had nothing to do with the murders that happened or the shooting of Gabrielle Giffords,” said Humphries, who was on his way Sunday to attend services for his friend Dorwan Stoddard, 76. “And I wonder, if he (Fuller) is crazy or is he the canary in a coal mine? Is he saying what a lot of other people are holding in their hearts? If so, that’s a problem.”

___

Susan Montoya Bryan contributed from Tucson. Christie reported from Phoenix.