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The zealous diplomats in Helsinki did not believe him and wrote back to Berlin that “Borg, even though he claims otherwise, is not telling the truth.”

The different ministries that were involved in the dog scandal — the Foreign Office, the Economy Ministry and even Hitler’s Chancellory — meticulously reported all their findings about the canine.

The economy ministry announced that the German chemical conglomerate IG Farben, which had supplied Borg’s wholesale trade with pharmaceuticals, offered to eliminate his company by ending their cooperation with him.

Based on all this support, the Foreign Office was already looking for ways to bring Borg to trial for insulting Hitler, but in the end, none of the potential witnesses were willing to repeat their accusations in front of a judge.

On March 21, 1941, the Foreign Office asked the Chancellory whether to press charges against Borg and five days later they answered that “considering that the circumstances could not be solved completely, it is not necessary to press charges.”

There’s no evidence that Adolf Hitler was ever told of the case, even if the case made it all the way to his chancellory, Mr. Hillenbrand said.

Tor Borg died at 60 in 1959. A spokeswoman for Tamro Group, Margit Nieminen, said the dog died a natural death, and Josefine Borg passed away in 1971. Borg’s company Tampereen Rohduskuppa Oy eventually became Tamro Group, the leading wholesale company for pharmaceuticals in the Nordic countries.

Ms. Nieminen told the AP that the company had not been aware of the story surrounding Borg’s dog until the recent archive discovery.