Winehouse autopsy inconclusive; parents thank fans

continued from page 1

The singer had battled her demons in public, too often making headlines for erratic behavior, destructive relationships and abortive performances.

But she was remembered fondly by her neighbors in Camden, the creative but gritty neighborhood where she lived on and off for years.

“She was too young to die and too talented, and too beautiful,” said Peggy Conlon, landlady of the Dublin Castle pub, where Winehouse occasionally stopped for a drink. “She’s sorely missed by everyone, not one person had a bad word to say about that kid.”

Last month, Winehouse canceled her European comeback tour after she swayed and slurred her way through barely recognizable songs in her first show in the Serbian capital, Belgrade. Booed and jeered off stage, she flew home and her management said she would take time off to recover.

Her last public appearance came three days before her death, when she briefly joined her goddaughter, singer Dionne Bromfield, on stage at The Roundhouse in Camden, near her home.

Actor Russell Brand, a former drug addict, wrote a lengthy tribute in which he urged the media and public to change the way addiction is perceived — “not as a crime or a romantic affectation but as a disease that will kill.”

Winehouse and I shared an affliction, the disease of addiction,” he wrote. “Addiction is a serious disease; it will end with jail, mental institutions or death.”

Winehouse released only two albums in her lifetime — 2003’s “Frank” and the chart-topping “Back to Black” in 2006. Both shot up the music charts as fans bought them to remember her by.

Gennaro Castaldo of music chain HMV said “Back to Black” was the retailer’s best-selling album. It was also iTunes’ No. 1 album in more than a dozen countries including the U.S., Britain, France, Germany and Canada.

Celebrity fans continued to pay tribute to an artist whose appeal crossed genres and generations.

On Twitter, singer George Michael called her “the most soulful vocalist this country has ever seen.”

“I hope she is at peace now,” he added.

Soul singer Adele — one of a generation of British chanteuses whose success Winehouse helped make possible — said Winehouse “paved the way for artists like me and made people excited about British music again whilst being fearlessly hilarious and blase about the whole thing.”

“Although I’m incredibly sad about Amy passing I’m also reminded of how immensely proud of her I am as well, and grateful to be inspired by her,” Adele wrote on her website.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks