Lawyer: Norway terror suspect likely insane

Says his client will never walk free

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“This whole case has indicated that he’s insane,” he told reporters.

Earlier, Norway’s justice minister told reporters that employees from his department are still missing.

There is a particular focus on identifying the dead since authorities dramatically lowered the death toll Monday, apparently because they counted 18 bodies twice in the confusion following the massacre. They initially said 86 people died on the island, but now say the figure is 68.

“The Justice Ministry has people who are missing, we have people who are very hard hit by this and we are without offices,” minister Knut Storberget told reporters.

Storberget also offered a defense of the police in response to a question about the mounting admissions of missteps.

Police have acknowledged that they took 90 minutes to reach Utoya island. They weren’t able to deploy a helicopter because the entire crew had been sent on vacation. Victims who called emergency services from the midst of the massacre reported being told to stay off the line because authorities were dealing with the Oslo bombing.

“I feel the police have delivered well in this situation. I also feel they’ve delivered especially well on the points where there’s been criticism raised,” said Storberget.

Oslo police chief of staff Johan Fredriksen responded to the criticisms with more heat.

“We think it is unworthy that single players have brought political and resource questions into this situation that we are in right now,” he said at a news conference. “We don’t want to take part in that debate anymore.”

“We can take a lot, we’re professional, but we are also human beings,” he said.

When asked if police would open an investigation into their conduct, Storberget indicated that such a probe was for the future.

“It’s very important that we have an open and critical discussion about how all sections of society handle a situation. … But there’s a time for everything, and we have been fully focused and continue to be focused on taking care of all those that have been affected,” said Storberget.

Breivik made his first appearance in court on Monday to answer the terrorism charges against him.

While 21 years is the stiffest sentence a Norwegian judge can hand down, a special sentence can be given to prisoners deemed a danger to society, who are locked up for 20-year sentences that can be renewed indefinitely.

In Breivik’s court appearance, he alluded to two other “cells” of his network — which he refers to in a 1,500-page manifesto as a new “Knights Templar,” the medieval cabal of crusaders who protected Christian pilgrims in the Holy Land.

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