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NFL doctors talk to teams about player safety

- Associated Press - Thursday, July 28, 2011

NEW YORK (AP) - NFL doctors and experts in heat-related illnesses have spoken with each NFL team this week.

The conference calls always have been mandatory, but they assumed added importance because of the 4 1/2-month lockout that ended Monday.

Participating were NFL doctors Hunt Batjer and Richard Ellenbogen, who primarily addressed head injuries. Also updating the 32 teams were Dr. Douglas Casa, chief scientist at the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut, and Dr. Margaret Kolka, former head of the Army's environmental medicine division. Casa and Kolka spoke about heat-related injuries.

There is added concern across the league about player conditioning because offseason workouts and minicamps were eliminated by the work stoppage.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP's earlier story is below.

NEW YORK (AP) _ NFL doctors and experts in heat-related illnesses have spoken with each NFL team on conference calls this week.

The calls always have been mandatory, but took on added importance in the wake of the 4 1/2-month lockout that ended Monday.

On the calls were NFL doctors Hunt Batjer and Richard Ellenbogen, who primarily addressed head injury issues. Also providing information to the 32 teams were Dr. Douglas Cava, chief scientist at the Korey Stringer Institute at the University of Connecticut, and Dr. Margaret Kolka, former head of the Army's environmental medicine division. Cava and Kolka spoke about heat-related injuries.

It was the first time Cava and Kolka were involved in the calls. There is added concern throughout the league about conditioning for players after offseason workouts and minicamps were eliminated by the work stoppage.

(This version CORRECTS APNewsNow. Corrects Cava to Casa, original information provided by source was incorrect)

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