- Associated Press - Thursday, July 28, 2011

LOS ANGELES (AP) - It started with a DJ’s simple tweet telling his followers about a free block party on Hollywood Boulevard.

Evidently, too many people got the message and the Wednesday night party quickly got out of hand.

The tweet lured thousands of raucous ravers to hear DJ Kaskade spin some tunes outside Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, the landmark cinema in the heart of Hollywood where stars press their shoes and handprints into cement slabs.

The movie theater was hosting the premiere of the documentary “Electric Daisy Carnival Experience” about a popular series of raves that were banned in Los Angeles after a teen died of a drug overdose. The film features Kaskade, whose real name is Ryan Raddon.

“He just wanted to do something for the fans,” Alastair Duncan, a spokesman for the DJ, said Thursday.

Duncan said Raddon had a permit from the Fire Department to play a free show and to close off one traffic lane for his flatbed truck bedecked with enormous speakers.

Michael Duddie, general manager at the Supperclub, which hosted Kaskade at an after-party following the premiere, said he saw the truck get hemmed in by people as it tried to make its way to the theater.

“He couldn’t get two blocks,” Duddie said. “Within three minutes, there were 1,000 people and within five minutes there were 3,000.”

Duddie saw the truck veer down a side street, followed pied-piper style by hundreds of ravers.

Without music, crowds outside the cinema grew restive and found themselves facing baton-wielding riot police. Three people were arrested after things turned rowdy, with would-be revelers hurling bottles at police and some jumping on a squad car.

Police and city officials were investigating what prompted the unruly crowd to gather. It was too early to say if Kaskade would face any legal action by authorities, city attorney spokesman Frank Mateljan said.

The crowds gathered soon after Kaskade tweeted: “ME+BIG SPEAKERS+MUSIC(equals)BLOCK PARTY!!!”

He apparently underestimated the appeal to his more than 92,000 Twitter followers. By 6 p.m., hundreds of people had gathered outside the cinema and were spilling onto the street. Police and fire officials soon closed the boulevard to traffic.

“They showed up because, allegedly, the DJ tweeted he was doing a concert,” fire Battalion Chief Michael Bowman said. “People’s expectation was they thought they were going to a free concert in the street.”

Kaskade later sent tweets urging peace.

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