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The program recognizes repeated word selections, like uses of the Hebrew equivalents of “if,” “and” and “but,” and notices synonyms: In some places, for example, the Bible gives the word for “staff” as “makel,” while in others it uses “mateh” for the same object. The program then separates the text into strands it believes to be the work of different people.

However, what the program won’t determine, say the researchers who created it, is whether the Bible is human or divine.

Three of the four scholars, including Mr. Koppel, are religious Jews who subscribe in some form to the belief that the Torah was dictated to Moses in its entirety by a single author: God.

“Those for whom it is a matter of faith that the Pentateuch is not a composition of multiple writers can view the distinction investigated here as that of multiple styles,” they said.

In other words, there’s no reason why God could not write a book in different voices.

“No amount of research is going to resolve that issue,” Mr. Koppel said.