- The Washington Times - Thursday, June 2, 2011

Prosecutors will not pursue criminal charges related to the death of a Silver Spring man near the DC9 nightclub in the District’s U Street corridor in October.

Citing “insufficient evidence to pursue criminal charges,” the U.S. Attorney´s Office for the District announced Thursday the case has been closed.

Prosecutors said Ali Ahmed Mohammed died from “excited delirium associated with heart defects, alcohol intoxication and physical exertion with restraint” and not from a beating at the hands of people associated with the club.

Early witness accounts suggested that Mr. Mohammed, 27, had been beaten, and a co-owner of the club and four employees initially faced charges in connection with his death. But the U.S. Attorney's Office said the initial reports were inaccurate and unsupported by medical and physical evidence or by other eyewitness accounts.

Authorities say the incident occurred after Mr. Mohammed threw two bricks through the window of DC9 in the early hours of Oct. 15 when he was turned away from the club after it had closed. A co-owner and some employees chased, seized, and held him down him until police arrived.

“In light of all the evidence, the medical examiner observed no physical injuries that reasonably could be associated with criminal homicide charges,” the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

In response to the announcement, Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman Gwendolyn Crump said police “made arrests based on those initial reports and all of the information that was available at the time.”

“The medical examiner's office ruled the case a homicide, and indicated that the restraint of Mr. Mohammed was one of the contributing factors in his death,” Ms. Crump said. “The original accounts by witnesses was not discovered to be mistaken or inaccurate until a more comprehensive review of the medical and forensic evidence was done by detectives and prosecutors.”