Obama to lay out pace of troop pullout

Faster than advisers recommend, but slower than liberal allies will like

Danny Montoya of Warrenton, Va., holds a sign up in Lafayette Park outside the White House on May 2, 2011, the morning after the country learned that Osama Bin Laden had been killed by U.S. Navy Seals. Montoya says that our first initiative following the Sept. 11 attacks was to get Osama Bin Laden, and he feels that now that he's dead, some of the U.S. troops who have been assigned to more remote areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan should be able to come home. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)Danny Montoya of Warrenton, Va., holds a sign up in Lafayette Park outside the White House on May 2, 2011, the morning after the country learned that Osama Bin Laden had been killed by U.S. Navy Seals. Montoya says that our first initiative following the Sept. 11 attacks was to get Osama Bin Laden, and he feels that now that he’s dead, some of the U.S. troops who have been assigned to more remote areas of Afghanistan and Pakistan should be able to come home. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

At a fundraiser in Washington on Monday night, Mr. Obama told supporters that he is fulfilling his promise by ending the war in Iraq this year and continuing on a path to turn over all security responsibilities to the Afghans in 2014.

“When I came into office, we had two active wars,” Mr. Obama said. “By the end of this year, one war will be done. And we will be transitioning in Afghanistan to turn over more and more security to the Afghan people.”

© Copyright 2014 The Washington Times, LLC. Click here for reprint permission.

Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus
TWT Video Picks