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After his detention by police in February, Galliano said he underwent rehabilitation treatment in Arizona for two months and also in Switzerland.

“After every creative high, I would crash and the alcohol helped me,” he said, adding that his creativity “helped make Dior a billion-dollar business.”

Asked why he didn’t tell police investigators about his addictions, Galliano responded: “I was in denial. I was still taking those pills and alcohol, and I was in complete denial.”

A couple contends that Galliano made anti-Semitic comments to them in the cafe in February. Galliano was taken in by police for questioning, and a sobriety test showed he was drunk. Another woman then came forward with similar claims about another incident in the same cafe in October. Both accusations were being addressed at Wednesday’s trial.

Days after the February incident, a video was broadcast on the website of the British tabloid The Sun showing an inebriated Galliano insulting a fellow cafe client, slurring: “I love Hitler.”

The court asked the designer about the anti-Semitic views he spouts in the 45-second-long video.

“These are not views that I hold or believe in,” he said. “In the video, I see someone who needs help, who’s vulnerable. It’s the shell of John Galliano. I see someone who’s been pushed to the edge.”

“All my life I’ve fought against prejudice and intolerance and discrimination because I have been subjected to it myself.

“I apologize for the sadness that this affair has caused and I apologize to the court as well,” Galliano said.

One member of the couple allegedly insulted, Geraldine Bloch, told the court that Galliano pronounced the word “Jewish” “at least 30 times” in the approximately 45-minute-long altercation.

Asked why, in their statements, no one else at the cafe appeared to have heard Galliano say the word Jewish, Bloch replied, “I am very surprised.”

“He didn’t say it any softer or louder than the other commentaries,” she said.

When asked if the designer appeared to be drunk, Bloch responded, “I don’t know if he was drunk but he was behaving completely strangely.”

Judges then asked why she remained seated next to him. Bloch said he had upset her so much with his “gratuitous insults,” that staying there became a “question of principle” for her.

Another patron of the cafe, 30-year-old English teacher, Marion Bully, was called as a defense witness. Bully said she was surprised that instead of changing tables, the couple ordered another drink.

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