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The Dodgers‘ filing follows that of the Texas Rangers, who sought Chapter 11 protection in May of last year. The Rangers’ filing successfully pushed through Hall of Fame pitcher Nolan Ryan’s $590 million bid to buy the team. Creditors had stalled the deal for months, arguing that the team had rejected higher offers.

McCourt has maintained he met the criteria set forth by baseball officials in order for the TV contract to be approved and would amend the conditions if needed. The Dodgers‘ current TV deal with Fox expires in 2013.

The divorce settlement, now voided because of Selig’s decision, called for a one-day “characterization” trial Aug. 4 to determine if title to the Dodgers is in Frank McCourt’s name or if the team should be considered community property and sold. Robert Sacks, an attorney retained by Frank McCourt, said the trial may be shelved and Superior Court Judge Scott Gordon could decide how to handle the former couple’s assets at a later date.

Gordon ruled in December that a postnuptial marital agreement that gave Frank McCourt sole ownership of the Dodgers was invalid. That cleared the way for Jamie McCourt, who served as the team’s CEO and was fired by her ex-husband two years ago, to seek half the team under California’s community property law.

Associated Press writer Greg Risling in Los Angeles contributed to this report.