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Monadnock is a scenic mountain with views of four states from its 3,165-foot-tall summit. Emerson and Thoreau both hiked it and wrote about it. New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union attorney Barbara Keshen said in her brief that it is said to be among the most-climbed mountains in the world.

A lawyer who was among the friends with him when Hummel stopped the filming forwarded details of the case to the ACLU.

Jonathan Doyle started this thing with nothing but good humor and intentions,” Keshen said. “But it does have serious overtones.”

Keshen and the state both filed motions Tuesday seeking favorable verdicts. Doyle is seeking attorneys’ fees, nominal damages and to be allowed to videotape on Monadnock without having to get a permit.

Both sides agree there’s no need for a trial because no facts are in dispute. What they dispute is whether the administrative rule requiring permits, as it was applied to Doyle, violates his First Amendment rights to free speech and expression.

New Hampshire’s department of resources and economic development, which oversees the park system, referred all questions to the attorney general’s office because the case is in litigation.

Assistant Attorney General Matt Mavrogeorge said the rule is constitutional.

Doyle, who grew up in Keene and has attended several art schools but has yet to graduate, has done other stunts to elicit reactions. He created and drove a “Bat-Mobile” around Manhattan. He dressed as an angel and stood stock still in the main aisle of an Episcopal church. He also said he designs websites and murals and loves to paint.

“I don’t want to be locked in a Bigfoot suit forever,” Doyle said. “I’d like to be able to do more.”

Bigfoot is the nickname given to sightings of large, hairy, human-like creatures that have been reported across the United States. Scientists are skeptical, at best, about its existence.