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NEW YORK

Lawmakers eye bounty for victims

NEW YORK | Two congressmen from New York City say that up to $50 million in Osama bin Laden bounty money should go to first responders, survivors and families of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks.

The Rewards for Justice Program established a bounty of $25 million in 2001 to help bring bin Laden to justice. In 2004, Congress passed legislation providing the secretary of state up to $50 million to award for information leading to the capture of bin Laden.

Bin Laden was killed last week. It’s unclear whether anyone is eligible for the bounty.

U.S. Reps. Anthony D. Weiner and Jerrold Nadler said Sunday that the funds should be redirected to organizations that assist first responders, families and survivors affected by the 2001 terror attacks.

The state department didn’t immediately comment.

CHENEY

Cheney considering transplant operation

Former Vice President Dick Cheney said he hasn’t decided whether to seek a heart transplant.

Mr. Cheney told “Fox News Sunday” that his health has improved since last year, when he was diagnosed with end-stage heart failure. He had an operation last summer to fit his body with a battery-powered device that helps his heart pump blood.

In his Fox appearance, Mr. Cheney spoke with a raspy voice and appeared less gaunt than he had in the months after the operation.

Mr. Cheney said he is working on a book and planning a fishing trip later in May.

Asked how he could go fishing safely with an electrical device attached to his body, the 70-year-old former vice president quipped, “You’re not supposed to fall in.”

CONGRESS

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