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Sawyer asked Giffords if she was ever angry about what happened to her. Giffords replied, “No, no, no. Life, life.”

The television interview comes as fellow victims of the shooting came to Washington to testify in favor of a gun-control bill. They said that Giffords‘ appearance represents a major milestone for them as it helps them cope with the trauma they’ve endured over the past 10 months. About a dozen survivors and family members are in Washington lobbying for legislation that would extend criminal background checks to all gun sales and enhance the quality of the FBI’s criminal background checks.

Ken Dorushka, who was shot in the arm as he shielded his wife, says the victims have become like close family members and would watch the broadcast together.

“Any time one of us has a success, it affects all of us and it helps our healing,” Dorushka said.

The Tucson victims described Giffords‘ recovery as a miracle. Nancy Bowman, a nurse who was at the scene, said Giffords‘ recovery is a testament to her drive and courage.

“I don’t think there’s a single one of us who saw what happened to her who could possibly have believed that she could survive. I certainly never dreamed I would ever be able to experience Gabby Giffords on TV speaking to the country.”

The man arrested at the shooting, Jared Loughner has pleaded not guilty to 49 charges stemming from the Jan. 8 shooting. He’s being forcibly medicated with psychotropic drugs at a Missouri prison in an effort to make him mentally competent to stand trial.

In Monday’s broadcast, Giffords and Kelly both expressed their concern that Loughner did not get the help he needed.

“If he had received some treatment, this probably never would have happened,” Kelly said.