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In the email dated Nov. 8 from McQueary’s Penn State account, the former Nittany Lions quarterback wrote: “I did stop it, not physically … but made sure it was stopped when I left that locker room… I did have discussions with police and with the official at the university in charge of police….no one can imagine my thoughts or wants to be in my shoes for those 30-45 seconds…trust me.”

Added McQueary: “Do with this what you want…but I am getting hammered for handling this the right way…or what I thought at the time was right…I had to make tough impacting quick decisions.”

Emails to McQueary from AP were not immediately answered.

The case apparently took on new urgency two years ago, when a woman complained to officials at her local school district that Sandusky had sexually assaulted her son. School district officials banned him from school grounds and contacted police, leading to an investigation by state police, the attorney general’s office and the grand jury.

Gov. Tom Corbett took the case on a referral from the Centre County district attorney in early 2009 while he was serving as attorney general.

He bristled Tuesday when asked whether it was fair for people to criticize the pace of the probe.

“People that are saying that are ill-informed as to how investigations are conducted, how witnesses are developed, how backup information, corroborative information is developed, and they really don’t know what they’re talking about,” he told reporters.

The attorney general’s office declined to comment on the pace of the investigation.

The Patriot-News of Harrisburg reported Monday that only one trooper was assigned to the case after the state took it over in 2009. It wasn’t until Corbett became governor early this year that his former investigations supervisor in the attorney general’s office, Frank Noonan, became state police commissioner and put seven more investigators on it, the newspaper said.

Noonan’s spokeswoman, Maria Finn, said Tuesday that manpower was increased in the case this year, but she could not confirm the numbers reported by the newspaper.

“The investigation, at the time, was gaining momentum,” Finn said. “There were more leads, there were more things to do at that point. It’s not that the state police weren’t doing anything and Noonan comes in and changes things.”

With the case now drawing global media attention and potential civil litigants watching from the sidelines, Sandusky went on the offensive in the NBC interview.

“I would knock my client over the head with a two-by-four before I would let them do it, but it cuts both ways,” said criminal defense lawyer Mark Geragos, who represented O.J. Simpson and other celebrity defendants. “If prosecutors use it, it can end up being testimony without cross examination.”

He called the Penn State an unusual case that may call for unusual tactics, given the “instantaneous uproar to convict the guy.”

Penn State’s trustees have hired the public relations firm Ketchum, which through corporate communications director Jackie Burton said only that “the details of all our client assignments are confidential.”

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