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“They do an exhaustive review of their security procedures every time something like this happens,” he said. “Nothing ever works perfectly. They will undress this completely and then they will find out when they rebuild the incident exactly what they could have done better.”

Bongino, who recently left the Secret Service to run for U.S. Senate in Maryland, said it was doubtful that a gunman could strike a target such as the White House from a moving car at the distance investigators suspect he shot. It would require “an incredible amount of training to pull that off,” he said, suggesting it was more likely Ortega stopped his car to fire.

An official who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing said Ortega used a knockoff of an AK-47. Late Wednesday, however, authorities had not conclusively linked the gun to the rounds found at the White House.

In the days after the gunfire, police distributed photos of Ortega, including one that showed the word “Israel” tattooed on his neck, the name of his son. He had been stopped and questioned Friday morning just across the Potomac River from Washington in Arlington, Va. Arlington police said they stopped him after a report of suspicious behavior but released him after photographing him because they had no reason to make an arrest.

Subsequently, a U.S. Park Police crime bulletin said he was known to have mental health issues.

Ortega should be considered unstable with violent tendencies,” the bulletin stated.

Ortega was arrested Wednesday afternoon at a hotel near Indiana, Pa., about 55 miles east of Pittsburgh, the Secret Service said. A book bag he left behind when he was arrested, however, briefly caused a bomb scare because police initially didn’t know who it belonged to.

State troopers said Ortega had visited the hotel in recent days, and investigators believed he was back in the area Wednesday. The Secret Service passed out photographs and a desk clerk recognized his picture.

Ortega was reported missing Oct. 31 by his family. A message left for Ortega’s mother Wednesday at an Idaho Falls restaurant where she works was not returned. Phone listings for family members in the city were disconnected.

Ortega has an arrest record in three states but has not been linked to any radical organizations, U.S. Park Police have said.

Associated Press writers Jessie Bonner in Boise, Idaho; Joe Mandak in Pittsburgh; Kevin Begos in Indiana, Pa.; Eric Tucker in New Orleans; and Matt Apuzzo in Washington contributed to this report along with Associated Press researcher Monika Mathur in New York and AP photographer Haraz Ghanbari in Washington.