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Uehara has struggled in the postseason, but Adams has been excellent, and all Gonzalez did in the AL championship series against Detroit was allow one run over 7 2-3 innings. He wound up earning two wins, becoming only the fifth reliever to accomplish that in an ALCS.

“You know, it was obvious that we had some weakness in the bullpen as the season started and progressed until the trading deadline,” Washington said, “and then it got us two pieces to help settle down the bullpen, and put people in position where they always knew where they would pitch when an opportunity presented itself in a ballgame. And from that point on, we began playing the type of game we knew we were capable of playing.”

If those late acquisitions were the turning point for the Rangers bullpen, the Cardinals’ success can be traced to an Aug. 24 team meeting.

St. Louis was floundering back then, well out of playoff contention, when it gathered behind closed doors and decided to start playing every game like it was a one-game playoff. That meant using the bullpen as much as necessary, whenever necessary, even at the risk of burning it out.

Not even a baseball lifer such as La Russa could imagine how they would respond.

The bullpen was responsible for just six losses from Aug. 1 on, five coming in extra innings. St. Louis put together the NL’s best record over the final month of the season as it chased down Atlanta in a dramatic wild-card race, with only three losses credited to all its relief pitchers.

The Cardinals’ starters are averaging about five innings per postseason outing, roughly the same as their Texas counterparts, which means La Russa has been on the phone just as much as Washington.

“That’s the thing that I’ll probably remember the most about this season,” La Russa said. “It’s the most interesting story on our team, except for the heart we showed coming back, as to how much of a weapon the bullpen has become.”

Especially considering where it came from.

The Cardinals blew the second-most saves in the majors this year, but most of those came with a vastly different set of guys. Nobody seemed able to nail down the ninth inning early in the year, and it took a while for everyone to finally grow comfortable in their roles.

That includes Jason Motte, who has grown nicely into the closer job. He has a 1.47 ERA since the All-Star break, and just four of the 32 runners he’s inherited this season have scored.

“It doesn’t matter what inning it is, we go out there and do our job,” Motte said. “The last month and a half of the season, we’ve had to win. And we went out there with the attitude, not to freak out, not to tense out. And it’s worked.”